Cleaning up London

Where in the Kitchen Should You Store Your Food?

Ali

One good advice on where you ought to store foodstuff in your kitchen is to follow what supermarkets do.

Besides this recommendation, there are a few factors every experts in food storage would consider when deciding where to place their food. These include food safety, smell, and food preservation.

Safety and Hygiene

To ensure that raw meat does not contaminate other items in the fridge, it’s highly recommendable that these raw items are stored at the fridge’s bottom shelf. This way, their juices’ drips cannot contaminate other food in the same fridge.

Smell

Peeled onions produce a horrible smell that penetrates through all parts of your fridge once they have been stored there for too long. Placing them in sealed boxes can reduce and delay the spread of their odour. However, there’s no better way of solving this problem than to consume them quickly before your fridge gets too smelly.

Preservation

Leftovers left either in the fridge or the freezer should generally not remain in your kitchen for more than four days, although the exact number of days that different food can last for varies.

To ensure that you stick to this four-day rule, try to place new leftovers behind older ones. This way, you will be reminded to consume the older items first.

Beyond leftovers, leafy vegetables are best stored in your fridge’s vegetable drawers. Meanwhile, roots can happily stay outside your fridge for a significant amount of time. Just remember to keep them in dark places. Exposure to light makes these vegetables sprout faster.

Incompatibility 

Some food items are simply incompatible and should not be placed next to each other due to one’s effect on another. For example, fruits like bananas and avocados emit gases that cause vegetables to go bad early. Next time you consider putting all your fruits and vegetables inside your fridge’s vegetable storage box, you might, therefore, want to think twice.

So what do you think about all the tips in this article? Do you have other storage tricks that you want to share with others?